Sunday, August 20, 2017

Utah Age Group Rankings 2017 - WOMEN ROUND 2

It’s time for Round 2 of the Utah Tri Buzz 2017 age group rankings!

We stand & applaud everyone on the list. Regardless of individual rank, these are all people who have gotten out to race and who support the local scene.

Think about it, how many people stayed in bed while you were out testing your limits?? 
How many others are active, yet too chicken to ever toe a start line??

Kudos to everyone in the rankings... you're strong in both body & mind!

Lastly, keep in mind this is for FUN... please don't take the rankings too seriously.




The methodology is simple:

* To be eligible for Round 2 Rankings, must have raced at least 2 of these 14 events on the local calendar (23 total races counting Sprint/Olympic options):


  • Icebreaker (Apr 8)
  • Ironman St. George 70.3 (May 6)
  • Salem Spring (May 13)
  • Sand Hollow - Sprint/Olympic (May 20)
  • East Canyon - S/O (Jun 10)
  • Rock Cliff - S/O (Jun 17)
  • Daybreak - S/O (Jun 24)
  • DinoTri - S/O (Jun 24)
  • Echo - S/O (Jul 8)
  • Toughman Utah Half (Jul 15)
  • San Rafael - S/O (Jul 15)
  • Topaz - S (Jul 15)
  • Jordanelle - S/O (Aug 12)
  • Black Ridge - S/O (Aug 12)

Round 1 (thru June): 2 race minimum
Round 2 (mid Aug): 2 race minimum
Round 3 (end of season): 3 race minimum (average of your top 3 races)




* The final rankings will be the basis for several “Most Improved” and other awards, not just awards for AG winners/podiums.

* Like last year, we take the AVERAGE of everyone’s top 3 races for the final rankings… this provides some incentive to get out and race often, as you can only help yourself by racing more. For example, if you have an off day, or even a dreaded DNF, that result will shake out of your top 3 average if you race 4+ times.

* We use your Overall % to calculate the rankings (which is shown in all the individual race “Results Breakdowns” we post). This is simply how you placed vs. the field - if you placed 60th out of 100 at a race, that’s 60%. If you placed 80th out of 200 at another, that’s 40%. In this case those two then average to 50%.

Your 50% average would then be stacked up to the rest of your age group for the rankings.


Last races up!

Sep 9:    Kokopelli (S & O) - St. George
               Bear Lake Brawl (S & O)
              
Sep 16:  Camp Yuba (S & O)
               Brineman (S, O, H) - Syracuse
               Bear Lake Brawl (Half & Full)

Oct 28:   Southern Utah Triathlon - St. George  ... TBD if will count for 2017 or 2018


So if you've participated in 2 qualifying races so far, it only takes ONE of these late-season events to qualify for the FINAL, "WALL OF FAME" rankings and become eligible for awards & swag (most improved awards, AG awards, etc). If you've raced 3+ times, racing again can only help you, as your "worst" results will shake out of your Top 3 average.

Get out and race!

















Related Posts

SWAG ANNOUNCEMENT 2017

WALL OF FAME Final Rankings 2016 - Women Part 2


WALL OF FAME Final Rankings 2016 - Women Part 1


WALL OF FAME Final Rankings 2016 - Men Part 2


WALL OF FAME Final Rankings 2016 - Men Part 1



Friday, August 18, 2017

Results Breakdown: Jordanelle 2017


Congrats to all who got out to race Jordanelle!

This post has more detail behind the results breakdown methodology if you're interested.

Along with other Utah races, we'll use these results towards SWAG ANNOUNCEMENT 2017Remember we take the average of your 3 best local races (overall %) for "Most Improved Triathlete" awards, rankings, etc, so plan your season accordingly!

FYI - the Utah Tri Buzz rankings are now being updated and will be posted soon.



The next few qualifying races on the Utah calendar are:

Sep 9:    Kokopelli (S & O) - St. George
               Bear Lake Brawl (S & O)
              
Sep 16:  Camp Yuba (S & O)
               Brineman (S, O, H) - Syracuse
               Bear Lake Brawl (Half & Full)



Jordanelle Olympic

note - Mr. Hawley is M3539











Jordanelle Sprint





Wednesday, August 16, 2017

Results Breakdown: Black Ridge 2017

Congrats to all who got out to race Black Ridge!




This post has more detail behind the results breakdown methodology if you're interested.

Along with other Utah races, we'll use these results towards SWAG ANNOUNCEMENT 2017Remember we take the average of your 3 best local races (overall %) for "Most Improved Triathlete" awards, rankings, etc, so plan your season accordingly!


The next few qualifying races on the Utah calendar are:

Sep 9:    Kokopelli (S & O) - St. George
               Bear Lake Brawl (S & O)
              
Sep 16:  Camp Yuba (S & O)
               Brineman (S, O, H) - Syracuse
               Bear Lake Brawl (Half & Full)



Black Ridge Olympic






Black Ridge Sprint












Monday, August 14, 2017

Locals at USAT Nationals - RESULTS


USAT Nationals took place this weekend in Omaha, NE. Here's a look at local results from Saturday's Olympic distance race, sorted by age group.

Stay tuned for Jordanelle & Black Ridge results breakdowns, as well as Round 2 of the Utah Tri Buzz rankings coming soon!






Wednesday, August 9, 2017

Black Ridge Start List

Below is a preliminary look at the Black Ridge start list. Of course you can't put a lot of stock in the self-projected times, but hey, it's kinda fun to sort it that way.

If you're new to the race, here's a detailed course preview from last year to get you ready.

Still another day or so if you want to join the party... register here!








“It is not the critic who counts; not the wo/man who points out how the strong wo/man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the wo/man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends her/himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if s/he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that her/his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat.” - Theodore Roosevelt


Tuesday, August 8, 2017

Jordanelle Start List

Jordanelle is essentially sold out, but we're told TriUtah is expanding the transition area by up to 25 spots.

So... if you feel like joining the party at this Utah triathlon classic this Saturday, go grab a spot before it's too late!



Preliminary Start List












“It is not the critic who counts; not the wo/man who points out how the strong wo/man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the wo/man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends her/himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if s/he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that her/his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat.” - Theodore Roosevelt



Sunday, August 6, 2017

Ironman Santa Rosa Race Report: Alison Amorim

Eight days ago Alison Amorim & Jess Perry placed 2nd & 4th OVERALL at Ironman Santa Rosa. We'll hopefully catch up with Jess in the near future, but for now we asked Alison to write a report of her stellar day.

Thanks Alison and congrats!


Santa Rosa was my 1st Ironman after becoming a full time mom and working full time! Wes Johnson, our coach and longtime friend, had the difficult task of finding creative and flexible ways to help fit in the hours needed to respect the Ironman distance, but also to achieve my personal goal. I completed 1 Ironman prior to this race (Coeur d'Alene in 2015). My time was 11:45 which included a 30+ min. mechanical on the bike and walk/run the last half of the marathon in 106 degrees! But I finished my 1st Ironman with my husband, Jorge! Going into this race, my goal was to put together a solid race in all three disciplines and more importantly, to have fun.

The Swim

The nerves. I come from a swimming background, BUT might be the most anxious person heading into the water. Prior to Santa Rosa, I had 2 frustrating swims/races in short and long distance races with cramping quads and shortness of breath. My number one race goal was to have a swim that felt smooth and controlled. No panicking! Ideally I would be well under an hour, so I started with the lead pack at the gun. I fell into a group of about 6 other swimmers and while we jostled for position in the draft, we worked together for the first lap. At the half way point, our group was separated in the chaos, but I stuck with 2 other guys. None of my nagging problems re-surfaced and I swam at a pace that was slightly out of my comfort zone. I knew the transition was 0.25 miles long and up a boat ramp, so I backed off on the last 50 meters to relax for the uphill run. I didn't use my watch for the swim and didn't know my time or position in the race with all the chaos, but felt awesome in the water. I saw my husband for a while since it was a slow uphill run before heading out onto the bike.


The Bike

Cycling is my weakest of the 3 disciplines, so this was the part of the race where I needed to stick to my race plan. I use a powermeter and knew the watts I needed to hold... but easier said than done. I knew I was the first woman onto the bike- I like to race and have a bad habit of letting my watts drift to places they shouldn't be. The first 5ish miles were a steep descent and into some not-so-rolling hills! I found my legs fatiguing around mile 40 and backed off to just below my goal watts for about 10 minutes. With refreshed legs, I kept my watts in check! One woman passed me somewhere between miles 40-50 and despite my inner crazy screaming to chase her, I let her go and stuck with the plan. The roads were rough and I was covered in nutrition. I only use F2C and Cliff Blocks with a little water from the Aid Stations. With such rough roads, my pace slowed, but luckily I didn't flat or wreck like so many other riders out there. The bike finished with 2 flat 25ish mile loops which became pretty chaotic, but I was able to see my husband twice (this was my 1st time racing without him). I'm not a very emotional racer, but I teared up both times.



The Run

The only race plan was to have a comfortable 1st half marathon and then pick up the pace if I was feeling good. I started the run feeling fresh from the flat miles at the end of the bike, but my Garmin wasn't working... so I ran on "feel". I come from a sprinting background and don't have a much long distance experience... so there isn't much "feel." My pace gradually slowed throughout the 3 loop mostly trail marathon. When the race looped through the downtown area, there were tons of cheering people and I saw Jorge and the BAM squad about 9 times... but the majority of the run was on a dry, quiet trail. The 1st loop flew by and I was running pretty calmly behind another athlete, but lost him when I had to stop and retie a shoe. I finished my F2C and drank water, Coke and Red Bull from the multitude of aid stations. The 2nd loop was mentally very difficult. It was lonely, hot, and I knew I was slowing down (to what, who knows...) My only thoughts were to keep a high cadence and pick up my knees. Every time I saw Jorge I asked him, "Am I OK?" and he just reassured me. The 3rd lap, in my mind should have been easy, it was the last lap and we were running home... but it wasn't. I started cramping and focused only on putting one foot in front of the other. The last 2 miles crept by despite being in the cheering crowds and I definitely had nothing left in the tank. The course turned onto the streets for the LONGEST FINISH EVER. I left all my emotions and energy out on the course and all I could do was find my husband and give him a huge hug.

Alison & Jess Perry

Swim 53:34  Bike 5:37:45  Run 3:38:49  Total 10:20:51

This may not be the most exciting race report, but I truly stuck to my race plan and raced my own race. I knew the marathon was going to hurt and it did. But was it fun? Today i can say yes (it's a week out!). There is so much time to think in long distance races and I let my mind wander to my 15 month old, husband and the rest of my awesome support system. Seeing your teammates, friends and coaches on the course, people who have invested so much time and emotion in you...its enough to make anyone tear up. It wouldn't be the same without you!


Check out this recap including 
Alison's 2nd place overall finish!




husband & wife Kona power couple!

Friday, August 4, 2017

Ironman Crusher: Interview with Brice Williams

Dr. Brice Williams is a 2x Kona qualifier who shredded IM Santa Rosa last week with a time of 9:21. Among other things, here he talks about deciding not to accept the Kona slot this year and shares some great advice for the tri community.

Thanks for the time, Brice!


What’s your athletic background and how did you get into triathlon?

I swam in high school, did a little track and wrestling. Even tried out for basketball (that didn't go well). I swam one year at BYU as a sprinter, but then went on my LDS mission, and came home fat and slow. I then went on to race motocross through the rest of college and half of medical school until I had my first little girl, and got hurt. The bike was sold and motocross was a thing of the past. My wife had done a few triathlons with her dad growing up. She and he were the ones that got me into them. I did my first race back here in Utah during my first year as a ophthalmology resident. After that I was hooked.

Last year you were the 2nd fastest Utahn at Kona in 10:16 (Sebe Ziesler 10:06)… how would you summarize your race & overall experience on the Big Island?

Race and experience were awesome! Looking forward to going back and performing to my potential. The first time racing there is always a learning experience. I had a couple bike flats and I under biked last time, which really set me up for a good run, but overall I left A LOT on the table. I took the family and that was great. We came out to Oahu for three or four days, then went to the big island a week before the race. We left Monday after the race. The only thing I may do different next time would be to go out by myself about a week before, get in all the training and recovery I need to, then the family joins me Friday before the race. Then we stay for another week or so after the race doing the tourist stuff. That way my energy isn't constantly divided between the race and the family. Plus, I get a week to eat like a Hawaiian.



Out of curiosity, roughly what would you say the all-in $$ cost of the Kona trip is? Do you get absolutely gauged on housing or is it reasonable?

Housing can be all over the place depending on what you do. I would say plan on 5-10 thousand dollars in expenses to go over there and stay for a week or two. Take your family and make a vacation out of it.

What other Ironmans have you done, and what are your thoughts on Santa Rosa in comparison?

Santa Rosa was my fourth Ironman race. I've done Maryland, Tahoe and Kona. I thought Santa Rosa was great in comparison, but each race was fun. Not too cold, not too hot. Now that it's in May it would be too cold for me. Tahoe was way too cold. Kona was just right (are you getting a feel for what a wuss I am when it comes to the cold?). Santa Rosa has a great bike route, lots of rolling hills in the beginning, then flat and fast at the end. It's not the best spectator course, the swim is hard to get to and the bike is spread out, run is a bit better, but not much to do around Santa Rosa for kids. Maryland was great and an easy course, and weather is usually nice, but sometimes they have trouble with the water being too rough. Again, not the best place for kids, but still fun overall. I really want to do Texas, but have been injured twice leading into that one and had to withdraw. If doing a Saturday race is a priority for you then I would recommend Santa Rosa, Texas, Maryland and Florida. Then of course Kona. It's nice to have a few races to choose from that take place on a Saturday.


Lake Tahoe: Brice, Luke Rothey, BJ Christenson & Marc Rosello

You finished in a blistering 9:21 (~54, 4:55, 3:23), good for 2nd in your AG and 10th overall… were you aware of your place throughout the day? Did you feel strong all the way through or have to mentally and physically really dig deep?

Thanks! I knew out of the swim and on the bike that I was close to the top 5 or so, spectators and announcers kept us a bit informed. On the run... on the first lap I stayed pretty much in the same position, 5-7 or so. After that you couldn't really tell who was on which lap so I lost track of my placement, plus with the rolling start you never really know. In reality it didn't really matter to me. I was racing my race and focused on the things I could control (heart rate, attitude, nutrition, etc). I did have to dig a bit deep on the run. I was still recovering from a tibial stress fracture and my longest run going into the race was the week before at 11 miles, on a treadmill with a bit of incline just to make the impact softer. So, you can imagine the run was going to be a bit of a mystery. I knew the first 13 miles would be fine, after that it was going to be pure mind over body and not quitting despite any pain. While it was not my fastest run ever, it wasn't too bad overall.

Why did you choose not to take the well-earned Kona slot this year? Had you already made that decision beforehand or did you arrive there afterwards? Also, did you go to the awards ceremony and give some lucky guy the news?

I had already decided that this was going to be my last full distance race for a couple years. I knew that might mean leaving behind a Kona slot, but that was OK. I feel like I can get back there anytime as long as I'm healthy and give it a good 4-6 mos of dedicated training. Why leave full distance races for a couple years? I had been going at this now for a couple years, and it comes with some significant sacrifice. The time, the constant fatigue (mental and physical), the diet, the recovery demands and overall discipline take its toll on the family/work/church/etc. It was time to let that go for a bit and focus on other things. In the end this is for fun, and one has to keep priorities straight. At Santa Rosa I stayed for the awards, but didn't stay for the Kona allocation, so not sure who got the slot, but I'm sure he's super excited.



From your perspective what’s the key to being able to run well off the bike at the Ironman distance?

Well, given that I didn't run much before Santa Rosa, my idea of this has changed a bit. If you have a strong running base, then you don't really have to run much to do a good marathon. Don't get me wrong, I did my fair share of water running and training on a zero runner, but my running volume was super wimpy compared to previous builds. So, take that for what it's worth. Otherwise I would say, bike within your abilities on race day, especially the first half of the bike. I race and train according to heart rate and power, both of which keep you in check. Highly recommend it. In training I rarely run without biking first. I would say, that for me, one key to running well off the bike is the way which my coach has me do my long ride/long run combo. It starts on Friday morning, biking long (anywhere from 4.5-6 hours), then immediately getting off and running 30-60 minutes (yes I go to work Friday afternoon, but I'm thrashed). The next morning (Saturday for me) I will get on the bike again for 1-1.5 hours. This is usually a recovery type ride with a short interval session, like tabatas or a 15 min above threshold effort, then I get off and do my long run (1.5-2 hours). If I'm to the point where I can and need to run over 2 hours in a single day, we will split the runs up into two sessions. For me, that would look like a run in the morning (1-1.5 hours), then in the afternoon doing the bike (1-1.5 hours) and the second run as a brick (1-1.5 hours).



All my runs, with the exception of one interval session a week, are all aerobic efforts based on heart rate, and, if I'm healthy, I'm usually running 40 miles/week. Those Saturday runs are usually not super fun, the legs are tired, and I'm tired. Thank goodness for caffeine, it gets me through those days. Going out on a second run Saturday afternoon, in the heat, after already running 15-20 miles in less than 24 hours and up to 150-170 miles on the bike is the closest way I have found to mimic the last half of a Ironman marathon (which is where the real Ironman race begins, the one in your head). Sunday is a recovery day in more ways than one. The other thing I'll mention that is key to having a strong second half of your Ironman marathon is to nail your nutrition on the bike and the first half of the run. If you mess up your nutrition during those parts of the race, it will manifest itself around mile 15-18 of the run.

What other general advice would you have for newer, less-experienced triathletes going long?

Take your time getting there. It's taken me two years of long distance competing to get to the point that I feel like I can "race" an Ironman. There is an important distinction between participating in a full distance Ironman and racing a full distance Ironman. Racing is a different ball game and takes time to figure it out. But it is what it's going to take to be competitive for a Kona slot on a consistent basis. Sure, you may get lucky and slide into a slot by the skin of your teeth, which is great, but to be consistent and confident in your ability to be competitive for a slot each time you "race", it will take years of specific and consistent training and racing. The other piece of counsel is to get a long distance specific coach. Two years ago I decided I wanted to go to Kona and I specifically went out and found a coach that specializes in getting people to Kona. His name is Doug MacLean and is part of the QT2 systems coaching service. Having him guide me through all this has made a world of difference. There are lots of triathlon coaches out there. Many of them are good, some are great. In general, just like in life, you get what you pay for. A long distance coach, that has a track record of getting people to Kona (if that's your goal), will be your biggest expense, but the best investment you can make.



You’ve pretty much reached the pinnacle of AG racing… what are your goals for the future? Will Kona and/or qualifying be an annual challenge and quest, or will you mix it up with shorter races (or time off, etc)?

My next two years will be focused on less training and shorter races here locally, maybe a couple half distance races each year. I've heard rumblings of a Utah state championship series in the works, and that sounds fun for next year. I would also like to help out a few friends reach their goals next year with a touch of coaching, something I haven't had time to do in the past. In my mind I'm thinking of doing Ironman Texas in 2019, and Kona later that year. I have a few goals in mind that I want to reach and that just may be my year to hit them.

What are your favorite local races and why?

Well, the Bountiful triathlon is one. I started that race about 10 years ago, then gave it to a friend, and she still organizes it every year. It's fun to show up and cheer people on or race it. It's a reverse order tri, which for a pool tri is my favorite format. I like Echo and Spudman, both have lots of good competition and the courses are great. Other than that I really haven't raced locally for a while. I'm looking forward to doing more local races in 2018.

Anything else you want to share?

Keep it fun! Sure, some days are not going to be fun, but overall you should enjoy the training. I've gotten caught up in the past in the whole "I have to qualify for Kona" thing, and that takes some of the fun out of the process. Lately I have tried to focus on enjoying the training process, enjoying being fit and most of all enjoying racing. Letting go of the outcome and focusing on "controllables" during a race has made racing more fun, and probably made me go faster. Letting go of outcomes has also made dealing with injuries easier as well.


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